he Thailand Medical News - Diabetes
Diabetes
There are roughly about 4 million Thais and about 380,000 expats in Thailand afflicted with this disease. Keep updated with ways to control and manage diabetes while also monitor what’s developing in the research sector of this disease.
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Source: University Of Bergen  Jan 05, 2019
Diabetes is caused by damaged or non-existing insulin cells inability to produce insulin, a hormone that is necessary in regulating blood sugar levels. Many diabetes patients take insulin supplements to regulate these levels. In collaboration with other international researchers, researchers at the University of Bergen have, discovered that glucagon.producing cells in the pancreas, can change i...
Source: Texas A&M University  Jan 01, 2019
A recent study led by researchers in Texas A&M University's department of nutrition and food science shows how a novel regulatory mechanism serves as an important biomarker for the development of diabetes, as well as a potential therapeutic target for its prevention. The study can be found online in the November edition of the diabetes journal of the American Diabetes Associati...
Source: Mayo Clinic  Jan 01, 2019
Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips.   When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweigh...
Source: University of Bristol  Dec 24, 2018
Scientists have identified a growth factor found in the kidneys that could minimise the diabetes-inducing effects of blood vessel damage. The research, led by experts in renal disease and translational health sciences from the University of Bristol  focused on a group of growth factors categorised as VEGFs, or vascular endothelial growth factors. These are growth factors produced by...
Source: University Of Tasmania  Dec 17, 2018
Diabetes has been tied to a number of complications such as kidney disease, but new research has found that older people with type 2 diabetes can also have more difficulties with thinking and memory.   During a five-year study, participants with diabetes showed a decline in verbal memory and fluency. Using MRI scans, researchers saw that the participants' brains were smaller at the star...