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HIV / AIDs
Read all about the latests in HIV/Aids research and treatment protocols and also developments made into various specific components of managing this disease that is by itself also evolving.
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Source: Massachusetts General Hospital  Jan 13, 2019
A study from a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified the specific function of a protein found in HIV and related viruses that appears to slow down viral spread in the earliest stages of infection. But they also found that, after initially slowing down the spread of infection, that function may help the virus survive later on by evading the immune response. Their report ...
Source: Pasteur Institute  Jan 01, 2019
Current HIV treatments need to be taken for life by those infected as antiretroviral therapy is unable to eliminate viral reservoirs lurking in immune cells. Institut Pasteur scientists have identified the characteristics of CD4 T lymphocytes that are preferentially infected by the virus – it is their metabolic (or energy-producing) activity1 that enables the virus to multiply. Thanks to met...
Source: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc   Dec 13, 2018
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine. Further, in HIV-infected men with virologic suppression testosterone was significantly associated with a higher BMD score at the lumbar spine, as reported in AID...
Source: University Of Montreal  Dec 01, 2018
Of the 50 million people around the world infected with HIV, less than one per cent have immune systems strong enough to suppress the virus for extended periods of time. These special immune systems are known as "elite controllers." But how do they actually fight HIV? Canadian scientists think they've found an important clue. TRIM5 Alpha protein Working in collaboration with a tea...
Source: Johns Hopkins University Of Medicine  Nov 28, 2018
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified two patients with HIV whose immune cells behave differently than others with the virus and actually appear to help control viral load even years after infection. Moreover, both patients carry large amounts of virus in infected cells, but show no viral load in blood tests. While based on small numbers, the data suggest that long-term viral remission migh...